Jealous Haters Since 1998!
Home | News | Reviews | Day In Rock | RockNewsWire | Singled Out | Feeds

Wes Anderson - Moonrise Kingdom

.
Without question, Moonrise Kingdom is the most distinctive and mystifying soundtrack Wes Anderson has concocted for his films to date. Anderson quietly came onto the film landscape in the mid-1990s with the release of Bottle Rocket. With the release of Rushmore a few years later he solidified himself as one of the most mesmerizing and ineffaceable directors of his time. Martin Scorsese singled him out as one of the few modern directors he felt were worth watching. A few months back when I saw a trailer for Moonrise Kingdom in theaters my wife immediately turned to me and asked me if it was a Wes Anderson film. As we continued to watch the trailer, we discovered it was. So what is it that make's Anderson's films so matchless and immediately recognizable? I'm not entirely sure that even a book could encapsulate the whimsy and magic of his films that are so identifiable, but something that's irrefutable is the music within his films. Whether it was the British Invasion influence that added emotional bliss and anguish to Rushmore, the Kinks who helped guide three brothers on a tour of India in The Darjeeling Limited, the ear-piercing sounds of the Ramones during the opening credits to The Royal Tenenbaums or the exuberant dance exercises of the Beach Boys and the Bobby Fuller Four on Fantastic Mr. Fox the music of each of Anderson's films is a character unto itself. The music isn't merely sonic dress-up but an integral part of the story, the script and it allows the viewer to dive into the head and heart of his characters.

The story of Moonrise Kingdom takes place in 1965 off the coast of New England where two twelve-year-olds let their youthful adoration for one another get the better of them as they venture by themselves off into the unknown wilderness. Being that the film is set in 1965 (four years before Wes Anderson was born), much of the music he usually turns to would not have existed. The twenty-one track collection is one of the most idiosyncratic, peculiar and cerebral soundtracks in recent memory. At the core of the soundtrack is Benjamin Britten's The Young Person's Guide to the Orchestra which was originally recorded in 1946 as an educational piece but became Britten's most enduring pieces and is continually used in the music education of children. The protagonists of the film are swept away by the royal choral sounds of Noyes Fludde which Britten composed in 1957. Without having seen the film yet, it's hard to say how much more the music will seep into me upon seeing the film, but just listening to the soundtrack, it's hard to deny it as it's paired next to several Hank Williams songs. "Long Gone Lonesome Blues" is so full of despondency from Williams howling wail to the weeping guitars. Then there are bonafide classics from Leonard Bernstein and a song from French chanteuse Francoise Hardy ("Le Temps De I'Amour"). Hardy's song is sung in French, but the sound of her voice is concurrently sweet, sexual and serendipitous. Despite not having been born in 1965, her voice triggers memories of first love and pondering of the past and instills the question of how one would take alternate paths if they could go back in time.

One of the album's most notable features is the ingenious suite composed by Alexandre Desplat who previously worked with Anderson on Fantastic Mr. Fox. His contributions to Moonrise Kingdom are indecipherable to most listener's ears when heard with the Britten and Bernstein selections. He not only created energizing music, but perfectly emulated the quintessence of the originals for Wes Anderson's vision. The album's closer "The Heroic Weather Conditions of the Universe, Part7: After the Storm" (say that really fast seven times in a row) is as full of sonic wonder as the album's opener "The Young Person's Guide To The Orchestra, Op. 34 Themes A-F" by Leonard Bernstein. After listening to this record a few times and despite its principally classical selections and overtones, it plays like a full album complete with valleys and peaks. If you have enjoyed Anderson's musical selections before, you will not be let down by Moonrise Kingdom as it captures the sense of adventure and throwing caution to the wind in a way one can only do when they're so full of childlike poise and self-assurance.

One never has an all encompassing grasp on every genre of music, so in essence we're all students who never graduate. I love my familiar favorites, but there is something stimulating of being taken into a world you never knew before. While I knew of Benjamin Britten, I had never studied nor heard much of his music and Wes Anderson changed that. Hearing his music side-by-side with wondrous new classical takes by Alexandre Desplat makes me appreciate it more and above all else, to seek out more about the man and his music. It has wetted my appetite for my next Wes Anderson adventure which only furthers my admiration for the soundtrack. While Moonrise Kingdom may not house forgotten favorites from the 1960s and 1970s you may have expected, it's a most welcomed musical detour and one you will surely want to revisit more than once.

Anthony Kuzminski is a Chicago based writer and Special Features Editor for the antiMusic Network. His daily writings can be read at The Screen Door. He can be contacted at thescreendoor AT gmail DOT com and can be followed on Twitter



Wes Anderson - Moonrise Kingdom
Rating:


Share this article


More articles for this artist .


...end


advertisement


.
advertisement

.
News Reports
.

Day in Rock: Dave Grohl and Corey Taylor Lead Teenage Time Killers Album Lineup- Guns N' Roses Guitarist Addresses Break Up Speculation- Scott Weiland Calls Supergroup 'A Scam'- more

Day in Pop Blink-182's Travis Barker Joins Yelawolf's Band- Burger Chain Sparks Controversy With Madonna Tweet- Amy Schumer Pranks Kanye West- Lana Del Rey Debuts New Song- more

Yesterday's Day in Rock: Taylor Swift Reveals Her Mother Has Cancer- Rich Homie Quan Surrenders To Police Over Alleged Nightclub Assault- Justin Bieber Duets With Ariana Grande- Mumford & Sons- more

 Subscribe To Day in Rock


advertisement

.
Top Rock News Stories

Today's Full Day in Rock Report

Scott Weiland and The Wildabouts Reveal New Guitarist

Metallica's James Hetfield Unusual Inspiration Revealed

Def Leppard and Stone Temple Pilots Members Launch New Project

Megadeth Gig Turned Down By Another Guitarist

Slayer Brought Closer Together By Jeff Hanneman's Death

Jack White Makes Large Donation To National Blues Museum

Vince Neil Performs Motley Crue Classics At Long Beach Grand Prix

Slash Already Working On Next Album

Anthrax's Charlie Benante Sitting Out Upcoming Shows

Rival Sons Member Rejects New Led Zeppelin Label

Linkin Park's Mike Shinoda Guest Hosting Nikki Sixx's Radio Show

Top Pop News Stories

Today's Full Day in Pop Report

Kanye West and Kim Kardashian Suing YouTube Co-Founder Over Leak

The Chemical Brothers Returning With New Album, Reveal First Single

50 Cent and Floyd Mayweather Apparently End Longtime Feud

Lady Gaga To Be Honored By Songwriters Hall Of Fame

Adam Lambert Compares His Ghost Town Song To Madonna's

Sia Recruits Heidi Klum and 'Game of Thrones' Star For New Video

Hilary Duff Releases 'Sparks' Lyric Video

Ed Sheeran Cooks Up 'Sing' Cover In New Online Video

OG Maco Streaming New 'OGZay' Mixtape with Zaytoven

Nick Jonas Covers Rihanna and Outkast

Miranda Lambert Goes Without Makeup For 'People' Most Beautiful

Latest Reviews

Recent Reviews and Interviews

Ladies Only: Jennie Abrahamson- Rachel Garlin- Nneka- More

Album of the Week: Led Zeppelin's When The West Was Won

Karyn Crisis' Gospel Of The Witches - Salem's Wounds

The Blues: John Mayall's Bluesbreakers- Arlen Roth, Mike Henderson Band- Slam Allen

Trauma Interview

Album of the Week: Bad Brains Self-Titled Debut Album

December in Red - The Way Out

Battleaxe - Power From the Universe Reissue

SOKO Interview

Road Trip: Historic Savannah

The Compulsions - Dirty Fun

Click Here to Buy T-Shirts!

Tell a Friend about this page - Contact Us - Privacy - antiMusic Email- Why we are antiMusic

Copyright© 1998 - 2015 Iconoclast Entertainment Group All rights reserved. antiMusic works on a free link policy for reprinting of our original articles, click here for details. Please click here for legal restrictions and terms of use applicable to this site. Use of this site signifies your agreement to the terms of use.